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Time and the Brain

March 29, 2012 by David Eagleman

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dean of Engineering

Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology

Speaker:

David Eagleman

Adjunct Professor in ECE, Rice University

Department of Neuroscience

Baylor College of Medicine

Time and the Brain

Thursday, March 29, 2012

4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

McMurtry Auditorium Duncan Hall

Rice University

6100 Main St

Houston, Texas, USA

Most of the actions our brains perform on a daily basis -- such as perceiving, speaking, and driving a car -- require timing on the scale of tens to hundreds of milliseconds. New discoveries in our laboratory are contributing to an emerging picture of how the brain processes, learns, and perceives time. We will demonstrate new temporal illusions in which durations dilate, perceived order of actions and events are reversed, and time is experienced in slow motion. Questions addressed include: Does your brain work in real time, or do you experience a delayed version of the world? How and why does the brain dynamically recalibrate its timing judgments? Does subjective time really slow down during a car accident?

Host: Tony Elam and Richard Baraniuk

Biography of David Eagleman:

David Eagleman is a neuroscientist and a New York Times bestselling author. He directs the Laboratory for Perception and Action at the Baylor College of Medicine, where he also directs the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law. He is best known for his work on time perception, synesthesia, and neurolaw. At night he writes. His work of fiction, SUM, is an international bestseller published in 27 languages. His book on the internet and civilization, Why the Net Matters, is available as an app for the iPad and as an eBook. His latest book, the New York Times bestseller Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, explores the neuroscience "under the hood" of the conscious mind -- that is, all the aspects of neural function to which we have no awareness or access. Eagleman has been named one of Houston's most stylish men, a Next Generation Texas Fellow, and a Guggenheim Fellow. He is an academic editor for several scientific journals, a research fellow in the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, and a board member of The Long Now Foundation.

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